Incoming First Year Student Guide for Summer Courses


Summer at UCLA is an important time for students to explore subject areas of interest, fulfill degree requirements, and further academic endeavors. It is important to your success at UCLA that you consider your summer as an essential aspect in your academic career.

Incoming first year students who wish to head start their undergraduate career this summer has two options to consider:


COLLEGE SUMMER INSTITUTE
CSI is an excellent way for you to make a smooth and successful transition into the first year at UCLA. You can find more information about this program on the CSI website. If you have submitted the Statement of Intent to Register to UCLA and have already decided to enroll in CSI, you can proceed to CSI REGISTRATION.


FRESHMAN SUMMER PROGRAM (FSP)
This seven-week rigorous academic residential program is open to students who qualify for the Academic Advancement Program (AAP). FSP students will enroll in three university courses that meet UCLA’s graduation requirements. You’ll receive close personal attention from professors, teaching assistants, counselors, and peer counselors, and you’ll work closely with peer learning facilitators in small groups or in one-on-one individual meetings. For more information on the Academic Advancement Program and the Freshman Summer Program, visit http://www.aap.ucla.edu/.

 

INDIVIDUAL ACADEMIC COURSES
If you are interested in individual courses, please seek out the help of an academic counselor prior to making any enrollment decisions as it is possible that you will receive credit for certain courses through Advanced Placement (AP) Exam Scores. We recommend that you reach out to your departmental counselor or attend a New Student Orientation session before enrolling in courses this summer, especially if you wish to take courses that may satisfy UCLA degree requirements.


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Your UCLA degree requirements will consist of:


You will find courses that may be of interest to incoming first year students below organized by each degree requirement type. While the following list is not comprehensive in outlining any degree, we hope it will help you make the first steps towards your graduation here at UCLA.

Information on important policies and deadlines concerning enrollment, payment, refund, and others is available on the ACADEMIC COURSES: UCLA STUDENTS section of our website.

Please read the description of the courses you intend to take before enrolling to ensure that you have fulfilled the requisites.

University Requirements

All UCLA students, regardless of their home UCLA College/School, are required to satisfy both University Requirements (Entry-Level Writing or English as a Second Language, and American History and Institutions).


ENTRY-LEVEL WRITING
Proficiency in English composition is vital to successful performance in many courses, and that is the reason why Entry-Level Writing is the only requirement for graduation that students must satisfy before entering UCLA or during their first year in residence. This requirement may be satisfied by:

EXAM OR COURSE

SCORE OR GRADE
College Board Advanced Placement Examinations in English

Score of 3, 4, or 5
International Baccalaureate High Level English A Examination

Score of 5, 6, or 7
International Baccalaureate Standard Level English A Examination

Score of 6 or 7
SAT Reasoning Writing Section

Score of 680 or higher
ACT Combined English/Writing Exam

Score of 30 or higher
Transfer credit for an acceptable college-level course in English composition

Letter grade of C or better
University of California Analytical Writing Placement Examination

Passing score (more information)

If students do not meet the requirement in one of the ways described above, students must enroll in a course determined by performance on the Analytical Writing Placement Examination as early as possible during their first year in residence. Satisfaction of the Entry-Level Writing requirement is a requisite for English Composition 3 and all subsequent English courses. For more information, see the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement website.

 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
All entering first year UCLA students whose native language is not English and who have not otherwise satisfied the English as a Second Language (ESL) requirement are required to take the Analytical Writing Placement Examination (AWPE). Neither the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) nor any other English proficiency test can be submitted or accepted in lieu of the AWPE. Undergraduate students may take the AWPE. Unauthorized retakes of the examinations result in an invalid examination score. For more information, please visit the Registrar’s Office website.

 

AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS
Students attending the University on an F-1 or J-1 visa may petition for exemption from this requirement by showing proof of temporary residence in the U.S.

The American History and Institutions requirement is based on the principle that a U.S. citizen attending an American university should understand the history and public institutions of the U.S. under the federal and state constitutions. Candidates for a bachelor’s degree must satisfy the American History and Institutions requirement by one of the following methods:

EXAM OR COURSE

SCORE OR GRADE
One year of high school American history or government (or a combination of both)

Letter grade of B or better
SAT Subject Test in U.S. History

Score of 500 or higher
College Board Advanced Placement Test in American History

Score of 3, 4, or 5
College exam, college course or UCLA Extension course

Must be approved by Board of Admissions

If you have not yet met any of the above requirements for the American History and Institutions Requirement, you may complete the requirement with the following course offered during the summer:

College Requirements

College requirements will vary depending on the UCLA College or School you belong to. UCLA has five undergraduate colleges and schools (College of Letters and Science, School of Arts and Architecture, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Nursing, and the School of Theater, Film, and Television ).

 

Writing I
The Writing I requirement may be satisfied by one of the following prior to entering UCLA:

Exam or Course

Score or Grade
College Board Advanced Placement Exam in English

Score of 4 or 5
SAT Reasoning Test Writing Section AND English 3 Proficiency Exam

SAT score of 720 AND superior performance on ENG COMP Exam

If not satisfied prior to entering UCLA, the Writing I requirement must be satisfied within the first three terms of enrollment by completing English Composition 3 (Session A | Session C), English as a Second Language 36, or an equivalent course with a grade of C or better (C- or a Passed grade is not acceptable).

 

Writing II
The Writing II requirement must be satisfied by completing one course from an approved list. The course must be completed with a grade of C or better (C- or a Passed grade is not acceptable). Writing II courses are listed in the Schedule of Classes.

If you have already completed the Writing I requirement, you may consider the Writing II courses listed below, offered summer 2017.

Ancient Near East Studies 10W (Session A | Session C)

Applied Linguistics 30W (Session A | Session C), 40W (Session A | Session C), 101W (Session A | Session C)

Asian M60W (Session C)

Comparative Literature 4CW (Session C), 4DW (Session A | Session C)

Disability Studies 101W (Session A | Session C)

English Composition 5W (Session C)

English 4W (Session A | Session C), 20W (Session A)

Engineering 183EW (Session A)

Music History 12W (Session C)

Scandinavian 50W (Session A | Session C)

 

Engineering Writing (School of Engineering ONLY)
The engineering writing requirement is satisfied by selecting one approved engineering writing (EW) course from the HSSEAS writing course list or by selecting one approved Writing II (W) course. The course must be completed with a grade of C or better (C– or a Passed grade is not acceptable). Students should NOT attempt to complete this requirement during the summer prior to their first year.

 

Quantitative Reasoning
The Writing I requirement may be satisfied by one of the following prior to entering UCLA:

Exam or Course

Score or Grade
SAT Reasoning Test Mathematics Section

Score of 600 or higher
SAT Subject Test in Mathematics

SAT score of 550 or higher

The quantitative reasoning requirement may also be satisfied by completing one approved UCLA course or an equivalent course within the first seven terms of enrollment. The course must be taken for a letter grade, and students must receive a grade of C or better (C- grade is not acceptable). Applicable courses may also be applied toward preparation for the major requirements and, if approved for general education (GE) credit, may fulfill a GE requirement.

Quantitative Reasoning courses offered summer 2017:

Philosophy 31 (Session A | Session C)

Political Science 6 (Session A | Session C)

Program in Computing 10A (Session A)

Statistics 10 (Session A | Session C), 13 (Session A)

 

Foreign Language (Not applicable to School of Engineering)
The foreign language requirement may be satisfied by one of the following methods:

  • Completing a college-level foreign language course equivalent to level three or above at UCLA with a grade of C or Passed or better OR
  • Scoring 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board AP foreign language examination in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Spanish, or scoring 4 or 5 in Latin, thereby earning College credit OR
  • Presenting a UCLA foreign language departmental examination score indicating competency through level three.

Consult the Schedule of Classes or the appropriate department for times and places of the regularly scheduled examinations. Students who wish to demonstrate proficiency in a language that is taught in a UCLA department that has no scheduled examination should contact the appropriate department to arrange for one. Students wishing to take an examination in a language not taught at UCLA should contact a College counselor.

The following language courses may be used to fulfill the foreign language requirement if not already satisfied:

American Sign Language (Linguistics) 8 (Session A)

Arabic (Near Eastern Languages) 8 (Session A)

Chinese (Asian Languages) 8 (Session A)

French (French and Francophone Studies) 1 (Session A), 3 (Session A), or 8 (Session A)

German (Germanic Languages) 8 (Session A)

Greek (Classics) 16 (Session A)

Hebrew (Near Eastern Languages) 8 (Session A)

Italian 1 (Session A), 3 (Session A)

Japanese (Asian Languages) 8 (Session A)

Korean (Asian Languages) 8 (Session A)

Latin (Classics) 16 (Session A)

Romanian (Slavic Languages) 103 (Session A)

Russian (Slavic Languages) 10 (Session A)

Spanish (Spanish and Portuguese) 1 (Session A | Session C), 2 (Session A | Session C), and 3 (Session A | Session C), 10 (Session A)

General Education Requirements

General education (GE) requirements are intended to introduce undergraduates to the richness and diversity of the various academic disciplines. Students are encouraged to explore the different possibilities for further university study. Whether or not students have a specific educational goal, general education requirements are designed to broaden their intellectual perspective and to set them on the path to becoming educated members of society.

General education courses are grouped into three foundational areas: Foundations of the Arts and Humanities, Foundations of Society and Culture, and Foundations of Scientific Inquiry. Each foundational area includes multiple subgroups that students must take courses from.

It is also possible that you will complete GE requirements through the completion of major requirements. If you are a Social Sciences or Humanities major, you may want to consider a course in the Foundations of Scientific Inquiry. If you are a Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, or Engineering major, you may want to consider a course in the Foundations of the Arts and Humanities or Foundations of Society and Culture.

 

FOUNDATIONS OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

College of Letters and Science, School of Arts and Architecture, and School of Nursing students will take one course in each subgroup. School of Engineering Students will take two courses in two the following subcategories. School of Theater, Film, and Television students will take five courses total, no more than two per subgroup.

Literary and Cultural Analysis

Chicano Studies 10A (Session A)

Chinese 70 (Session A | Session C)

Classics 10 (Session C), 20 (Session A), 30 (Session C)

French 41 (Session A)

German 59 (Session A)

International and Area Studies 31 (Session A)

Scandinavian 50 (Session A), 50W (Session C)

Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis

Chicano Studies 10A (Session A)

German 59 (Session A)

International and Area Studies 31 (Session A)

Linguistics 1 (Session A | Session C), 20 (Session A | Session C)

Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 60 (Session A)

Philosophy 3 (Session C), 7 (Session A | Session C), 22 (Session A | Session C)

Visual and Performance Arts Analysis and Practice

Chicano Studies 10A (Session A)

Design Media Arts 10 (Session A)

Ethnomusicology 25 (Session A), M119 (Session A)

French 41 (Session A)

International and Area Studies 31 (Session A)

Theater 10 (Session A | Session C)

 

FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIETY AND CULTURE

College of Letters and Science, School of Arts and Architecture, School of Nursing, and School of Theater, Film, and Television students will take three courses from the subgroup below, no more than two per subgroup. School of Engineering students will take one course in each subgroup.

Historical Analysis

African American Studies 6 (Session C)

Architecture and Urban Design 10B (Session A)

Asian American Studies 10 (Session A)

Chicano Studies 10B (Session C)

Classics 10 (Session C), 20 (Session A)

Geography 4 (Session A)

History 1B (Session A)

Korean 50 (Session A)

Social Analysis

Anthropology 9 (Session A), 33 (Session A)

Chicano Studies 10B (Session C)

Communication Studies 10 (Session A)

Environment 12 (Session A)

Gender Studies 10 (Session A)

Geography 3 (Session A), 7 (Session A | Session C)

Global Studies 1 (Session C)

International and Area Studies 1 (Session A), 31 (Session A)

Korean 40 (Session A)

Political Science 10 (Session A | Session C), 20 (Session A | Session C), 40 (Session A | Session C), 50 (Session A | Session C)

Public Policy 10A (Session A)

Study of Religion 11 (Session A)

Sociology 1 (Session A | Session C)

 

FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY

College of Letters and Science students will take two courses in each subgroup. School of Arts and Architecture students will take one course in any of the subgroups below. School of Engineering students only require one course in the Life Science subgroup. School of Theater, Film, and Television students will take one course in each subgroup.

Life Sciences

Anthropology 7 (Session C)

Astronomy 5 (Session A | Session C)

Environment 12 (Session A)

Earth and Planetary Sciences 15 (Session A)

Geography 5 (Session A | Session C), 7 (Session A | Session C)

Life Science 1 (Session A, Session C), 2 (Session A | Session C)

Linguistics 1 (Session A | Session C)

Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 90 (Session A)

Physiological Science 5 (Session C), 13 (Session C)

Psychology 15 (Session A)

Statistics 10 (Session A | Session C), 13 (Session A)

Physical Sciences

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences 2 (Session A)

Astronomy 5 (Session A | Session C)

Chemistry 14A (Session A), 14B (Session C), 14BL (Session A | Session C), 20A (Session A | Session C)

Environment 12 (Session A)

Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 (Session A, 15 (Session A)

Geography 5 (Session A | Session C), 7 (Session A | Session C)

Physics 1A (Session A | Session C), 1B (Session A | Session C), 1C (Session A | Session C), 6A (Session A | Session C), 6B (Session A | Session C), 6C (Session A | Session C), 10 (Session A)

Statistics 10 (Session A | Session C)