Online Courses


ACADEMIC COURSES:

ONLINE

 

UCLA online courses provide the tools and support you need to successfully participate in and fully utilize the online learning experience. There are dozens of online courses are offered this summer in a number exciting subject areas. Discover more about the unique experience of each online course by clicking on the course titles below.

African American Studies 1 - Introduction to Black Studies (5 units / GE credit)

The late political theorist Cedric J. Robinson described Black Studies as "a critique of Western Civilization." By that he meant interrogating the construction of racial categories, the production of difference, and the persistence of inequality; understanding how the very category of "Negro," "Black" or "African" came into being as a central feature of Western thought. This course will introduce students to that history, as well as the methods, theories, conceptual frameworks, and key debates in Black Studies.

Though primarily focused on the U.S., lectures and readings will extend beyond this country’s borders to explore the development, over time, of African American life, community, and culture against persistent anti-Black racism, economic and political exploitation, and gender oppression. By the end of the course, students should clearly understand the global and interconnected dimensions of the Black experience and a foundational knowledge of the discipline that will prepare students for more advanced courses in the field as well as in the humanities and social sciences, more generally.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Helmed by Professor Jemima Pierre, this course features a variety of guest lecturers from UCLA's Department of African American Studies.

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences 2 - Air Pollution (4 units / GE credit)

This course offers an introduction to the causes, scientific principles, and political and societal consequences of some of today’s most pressing environmental problems. Air Pollution phenomena such as the ozone hole, urban smog, climate change, etc., have in common that natural atmospheric processes have been severely disturbed by human activities. The goal of this course is to introduce the scientific concepts needed to understand the behavior of the natural and disturbed atmosphere. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the physics, meteorology, and chemistry of the atmosphere. In addition the biological and societal processes impacting the atmosphere and the environmental and health consequences of air pollution will be introduced. Scientific concepts will be taught through short online lectures followed by interactive activities, such as video recordings of experiments, online simulations, simple calculations, and analysis of atmospheric observations, with an emphasis on the understanding of the science of air pollution.

The scientific concepts introduced in this course will also be put in the context of current air pollution problems as they relate to students’ lives, including for example topics such as urban pollution, health effects of indoor air pollution, etc. The class further discusses the political and societal aspect of these issues as they have an important impact on the future of air pollution and the student lives. Students will learn to apply the knowledge gained in class to critically evaluate the current discussion of air pollution topics in the media.

The laboratory component of the course offers students a more hand-on experience on the various air pollution topics. Students will learn several scientific methods that are in use to study air pollution. These methods include air quality forecasting, data analysis, and a meteorological experiment.

Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences 2L - Air Pollution Lab (1 unit / GE credit)

Investigations and demonstrations including box model simulation, dose responses, air parcel motion and pollution dispersion, daily and seasonal variation of smog pollutants, and smog transport.

Civil and Environmental Engineering M20 - Matlab Programming (4 units)

Course is by instructor consent only.

Fundamentals of computer programming taught in context of MATLAB computing environment. Basic data types and control structures. Input/output, functions, data visualization, MATLAB-based data structures, and development of efficient codes. Introduction to object-oriented programming. Examples and exercises from engineering, mathematics, and physical sciences.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 103 - Applied Numerical Computing and Modeling in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Introduction to numerical computing with specific applications in civil and environmental engineering. Topics include error and computer arithmetic, root finding, curve fitting, numerical integration and differentiation, solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations.

Earth, Planetary, Space Sciences 16 - Major Events in the History of Life (4 units / GE credit)

This is a broadly interdisciplinary course, including material from diverse fields of understanding -- geology, biology, paleontology, atmospheric science, comparative planetology, evolution, and even aspects of the history of science and how science is done. It is intended to be interesting and educational, a course that will give you a basic understanding of life's long history on Earth and that will introduce knowledge and concepts of lasting value.

NOTE: EPS SCI 16 discussion sections meet via live weekly video conferences. Choose the time that works for you when registering. Visit the course website link above for more information about live sections.

J. William Schopf is an American paleobiologist and professor of earth sciences at the University of California Los Angeles. He is also Director of the Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life, and a member of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, and the Molecular Biology Institute at UCLA. Schopf is most well known for his study of Precambrian prokaryotic life in Australia's Apex chert. He has published extensively in peer reviewed literature about the origins of life on Earth, and he served as NASA's principal investigator of lunar samples during 1969–1974.

English 90 - Shakespeare (5 units / GE credit)

A survey of Shakespeare's plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare's breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement.

NOTE: English 90 discussion sections meet via live weekly video conferences. Choose the time that works for you when registering. Visit the course website link above for more information about live sections.

Michael J.B. Allen is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English and is the recipient of the Eby Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching. Besides lecturing on the Bard from China to Peru, he has taught at the University of Birmingham's Shakespeare Summer School in England, and at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. In 2011, he was the dramaturg for the film Three Days of Hamlet. He has published essays on Shakespeare and his contemporaries and co-edited Shakespeare's Plays in Quarto and Sir Philip Sidney's Achievements. He is also an authority on Renaissance Platonism.

English 150C - Topics in Shakespeare

Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare's works through broad or specific topics set by instructor.

English 163C - Jane Austen and Her Peers (5 units)

This course analyzes four novels by Jane Austen (Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Persuasion) from biographical, feminist, formalistic, generic, and historical perspectives. The novels are placed in the context of the development of Austen's narrative technique as well as the major political and social events of her day. To illuminate her interventions in these events, students read contemporary examples of the discourse on women's rights and the culture of sensibility.

NOTE: English 163C discussion sections meet via live weekly video conferences. Choose the time that works for you when registering. Visit the course website link above for more information about live sections.

Students who have not met the formal course requisites should contact online@tft.ucla.edu for enrollment information.

Anne K. Mellor is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of English. Her scholarly interests focus on eighteenth and nineteenth century British literature, women's writing, feminist theory, and the visual arts. Her most recent book, Mothers of the Nation - Women's Political Writing in England, 1780-1830, argues that women writers were instrumental in shaping public opinion during the Romantic era. She is the recipient of the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award, the Keats-Shelley Association Distinguished Scholar Award, two Guggenheim Fellowships, three NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers Directorships, and ACLS, NEH, Rockefeller and Australian National University Fellowships in the Humanities.

Film and Television 4 - Introduction to Art and Technique of Filmmaking (5 units / GE Credit)

This course will introduce students to the formal and aesthetic principles of cinema, cultivating students’ literacy in both media form and cultural representation. Many of us watch some variation of film and television each day. Though we may not realize it, the representations we see on screen can have a profound effect on how we understand social categories such as gender, class, race, sexuality, and national identity. In this course, students will gain fluency in the audio-visual language that comprises visual media and the complex ways in which that language creates cultural meaning.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Professor Jasmine Nadua Trice is an assistant professor of Cinema and Media Studies at UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television.

Film and Television 33 (4 units) and C132 (2 units) - Screenwriting

Film TV 33 – Introductory Screenwriting – 4 units

Learn the fundamental elements of effective storytelling for the screen. Work with a TA from the UCLA MFA screenwriting program to develop a short treatment for your own original feature-length screenplay.

Film TV C132 – Screenwriting Fundamentals  2 units

Follow the same lectures and readings as 33, but complete shorter written assignments. Class consists of lectures, readings, screenings, and two short papers.

Professor George Huang is a screenwriter and director who has worked on dozens of film and TV projects including S.W.A.T., Spy Kids, Machete and “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”

Note: Students may not receive credit for both Film TV 33 and Film TV C132. Students who previously took Film TV 133 may not take either of these classes.

Schedule of Classes: Film TV 33Film TV C132

Film and Television 84A - Overview of Contemporary Film Industry (4 units)

This course, also known as Navigating Hollywood, is an institutional analysis of the American film and television industry. Examine Hollywood's economic structures and business practices. Special emphasis on marketing and distribution systems, the history and operations of studios and networks and their relationships to independent producers, talent and agencies. Know as much as - or more than - the savviest Hollywood insider.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Professor Denise Mann is Vice Chair of the UCLA MFA Producers Program.

Film and Television 122M - Film and Television Directing (4 Units)

In this class we are going to explore the art and craft of directing. When we think of directors, we tend to imagine them on set deciding where the camera will go and guiding the actors, but a director’s creative work begins during the script phase and continues through final post-production. For those of you interested in making films, most of what is covered will be of practical use to you.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Filmmaker Rory Kelly is an assistant professor in the Department of Film, Television and Digital Media.

Film and Television 146 - Art and Practice of Motion Picture Producing (4 units)

An overview of the development, production, and distribution of feature films for the worldwide theatrical market. Topics include identifying material, attaching elements, and understanding the basics of financing for both studio and independent feature films.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Professor Barbara Boyle is Associate Dean and Professor at the School of Theater, Film and Television. Her company, Sovereign Pictures, has financed and distributed 25 films internationally, including My Left Foot and Phenomenon.

Geography 7 - Introduction to Geography Information Systems (5 units)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to fundamental principles and concepts behind the use and application of geographic information systems (GIS). Students will learn how to think spatially, become familiar with information technology, produce maps, and learn how to conduct data analysis with GIS. Key concepts and ideas are reinforced through lab assignments and activities with GIS. This course fulfills several GE requirements, including lab science requirements (see UCLA course catalog for details). There are no prerequisites for this course, and the course is open to all students.

Geography 167 - Cartography (4 units)

This course introduces the methods, techniques and considerations behind geographic data visualization and Web-based mapping. The first part of the course covers the basic concepts and techniques involved in Web content creation and development. The second part of the course focuses on data science and the cartographic process, and in particular, considerations surrounding data literacy and interpretation, data visualization strategies, and Web based mapping technologies. The third part of the course concentrates on visualization design and Web mapping frameworks. Practical applications are provided throughout the course.

Geography 168 - Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (4 units)

This course reinforces and introduces additional key geographic concepts and techniques related to the theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics such as geographic coordinate systems, geoprocessing, raster processing and analysis, digitizing, and various types of spatial analysis are given in-depth treatment during this intensive seminar. Spatial data literacy, data formats, and data manipulation practices are also emphasized. Students are trained in the use of both open source (QGIS) and commercial (Esri ArcGIS) GIS software platforms. In addition to exposing students to the variety of settings and situations in which such GIS techniques are used, students will also learn how to implement such techniques.

History 1B - Introduction to Western Civilization: C. A.D. 843 to C. 1715 (5 units / GE credit)

An introduction to the development of western society circa 1000 A.D. to the early stages of the Enlightenment and the death of Louis XIV of France in 1715. Emphasis is placed on specific historical topics, including the structures of medieval society, the changes in Western Europe during the Renaissance and Reformation, the establishment of new cultural paradigms in early modern Europe, and the encounter between the Old World and the New.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Teofilo Ruiz is a Distinguished Professor of History as well as a Guggenheim Fellow, National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and Recipient of the Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award from the Carnegie Foundation. He received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama in 2012, and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2013. His research focuses on late medieval and early modern Spain.

History 1C - Introduction to Western Civilization: C. 1715 to Present (5 units / GE credit)

An introduction to Western history in the modern period. Explore the rise of democracy and human rights, industrialization and urbanization, and nationalism and imperialism. Examine important historical events including the Napoleonic Wars, unification of Italy and Germany, World War I, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism, World War II, the Cold War, and Globalization.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Lynn Hunt is a Distinguished Research Professor of History. Her specialties include the French Revolution, gender history, cultural history and historiography. She has been awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, Guggenheim Fellowship, Getty Fellowship, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Fellowship, the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award, and has served at the President of the American Historical Association.

History 13C - History of the US: 20th and Early 21st Centuries (5 units / GE credit)

This course examines how the struggles of workers, women, racialized groups, artists and intellectuals, and the wealthy and powerful altered U.S. democracy starting at the beginning of the twentieth century. The main themes that are covered include the emergence of the U.S. as a world power, immigration, organized labor, the New Deal state, WWII, Civil Rights, feminism, ethnic nationalisms, the Cold War, decolonization, the Vietnam conflict, the global war on terror, and the current era of growing income inequality and privatization.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Robin D. G. Kelley is the Gary B. Nash Professor of American History. His books include the prize-winning Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original; Race Rebels: Culture Politics and the Black Working Class; Yo' Mama's DisFunktional!: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America; and Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination. Kelley's interests range widely, covering the history of labor and radical movements in the U.S., the African Diaspora, and Africa; intellectual and cultural history (particularly music and visual culture); urban studies, and transnational movements.

Italian 1 - Elementary Italian (4 units)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a sound basis for communicating effectively and accurately in Italian. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Italian 3 - Elementary Italian Continued (4 units)

Life Science 23L - Introduction to Laboratory and Scientific Methodology

Introductory life sciences laboratory designed for undergraduate students. Opportunity to conduct wet-laboratory cutting-edge bioinformatics laboratory experiments. Students work in groups of three conducting experiments in areas of physiology, metabolism, cell biology, molecular biology, genotyping, and bioinformatics. 

Linguistics 1 - Introduction to the Study of Language (5 units / GE credit)

This course explores the shared experience of language. Everyone speaks a language, notices different accents, is aware of everyday "grammatical mistakes", and makes jokes that use language in clever ways. Professor Harold Torrence examines of the nature of language, how the science of linguistics analyzes language data, and how language is integrated within culture and history. Contemporary mass media materials are used as sources for analysis and, in some cases, as ways to draw attention to common myths about language.

NOTE: Linguistics 1 includes weekly live sessions where the TA participates via video feed and students participate via live TA Text Chat. Live TA Text Chat sessions are conducted in a mixed format. The instructor participates via live video feed while students type questions, enter responses and participate in live polls. TAs prepare media and exhibits in advance and share them with students during the session. Students in Linguistics 1 can attend any one of several live TA Text Chat sessions scheduled each week. Attendance in at least one session per week is required. See the course website for session times and more information.

Nursing 3 - Human Physiology for Healthcare Providers (5 units / GE credit)

Basic understanding of human physiological processes, with emphasis on applications to patient evaluation and care. Concepts underlying normal function and how alterations in these normal functions can affect body systems. Knowledge and understanding of these normal human processes is basic to providing quality nursing care. Examination of system variations across lifespan.

Nursing 13 - Introduction to Human Anatomy (5 units / GE credit)

Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination.

Philosophy 3 - Historical Introduction to Philosophy (5 units / GE credit)

This historical introduction to Western philosophy is based on classical texts dealing with major problems including properties of rational argument, existence of God, problem of knowledge, nature of causality, relation between mind and body, possibility of justice, and others.

NOTE: Philosophy 3 discussion sections meet via live weekly video conferences. Choose the time that works for you when registering. Visit the course website link above for more information about live sections.

Sociology 1 - Introductory Sociology (5 units / GE credit)

Sociology is the systematic examination of society. This course explores its fundamental assumption that social life has sufficient regularity and logic that, like biology, physics, and geology, its operation can be explained by systematic observation and reasoning. Whether the subtleties of a conversation, the banalities and emotions of the family, the tensions of the workplace, the paradoxical inequalities of race, gender and class, the surprises of globalization, or the rise and fall of civilization, sociology offers the conceptual apparatus and methodological tools to explain what happens in society.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

William Roy is a Professor of Sociology whose specializations include corporate growth and state formation, political sociology, comparative-historical methods, social construction of reality, sociology of culture, and sociology of music. He is the recipient of the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award, the American Sociological Association's Distinguished Contribution to Teaching, a National Science Foundation grant, and a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.

Theater 10 - Introduction to Theater (5 units / GE credit)

Explores the principles and major components of live theatrical performance, including the collaborative dynamics between director, playwright, actor, and audience. The course covers major theatrical works from around the globe, exploring how theater is informed by and reflects its cultural and historical contexts.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

David Gorshein holds a Ph.D. from the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, and has designed many courses for theater majors and non-majors.

Theater 107 - Drama of Diversity (5 units / GE credit / College diversity requirement)

From Beyonce’s Lemonade to suffragette theater, drag queens to Hamilton, in this class we will survey a wide variety of 20th and 21st century theater movements and performances—interrogating the ways in which minoritarian theatermakers have used the stage to inspire their communities, create great art, communicate, agitate for political change and more. The dramas of diversity don’t occur only on the stage—some of them surround even the meaning of the word, how people use it in universities, and its status as an American value—the Drama of Diversity will balance a consideration of what diversity means and how it works today with introductions to many of the most exciting theater movements of the last hundred years.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Michelle Liu Carriger is Assistant Professor of Critical Studies in the Theater Department.

Theater 110 - History of American Musical Theater (5 units)

Survey of history of American musical: its composers, writers, and performers from musical's emergence in immigrant cultures to Broadway and Off-Broadway. With its roots in British music halls and comic opera, Viennese operetta and African American jazz, American musical theater emerged as vivid and popular art form with its own culture and identity.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

David Gorshein holds a Ph.D. from the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, and has designed many courses for theater majors and non-majors. This course features video lectures by beloved former Theater professor Gary Gardner.

Theater 120A - Acting and Performance in Film I (5 units)

An exploration of screen performance from an artistic, historical and cultural perspective. Examine the Stanislavski "method" and other techniques advanced by famed acting teachers such as Uta Hagen, Stanford Meisner and Stella Adler. Theater 120A, 120B and 120C explore different elements of screen performance and can be taken in any order.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Joe Olivieri is the Vice Chair of the UCLA Bachelor of Arts in Acting.

Theater 120B - Acting and Performance in Film II (5 units)

Examine challenges confronted by actors in ten film genres from the 1930s to the present. Streaming lectures and film clips illustrate skills required of performers in epic films, science fiction, musicals, comedies, action/adventure, Westerns, crime and gangster films, horror and suspense, war and anti-war films and dramas. Theater 120A, 120B and 120C explore different elements of screen performance and can be taken in any order.

This is a fully asynchronous course. Students do not need to be online at a specific time or report to a physical location for any portion of the class.

Joe Olivieri is the Vice Chair of the UCLA Bachelor of Arts in Acting.

Important Dates

FEBRUARY 15: Registration Opens

MARCH 2: FAFSA Deadline for UCLA Students

APRIL 1-30: Financial Aid Application for Current UCLA Students Available

MAY 17: Full Payment Due (Enrollment before May 17)

JUNE 21: Full Payment Due (Enrolled May 18 – June 22)

JUNE 21: Full Payment Due (Enrollment before June 21)

JUNE 28: Impacted Course Refund and Drop Deadline (Session A)

JULY 5: Nonimpacted Course Refund Deadline (Session A)

JULY 19: Grading Basis Change Deadline (Session A, 6wk)

AUGUST 2: Full Payment Due (Session C, Enrolled June 21 – August 2)

AUGUST 9: Impacted Course Refund and Drop Deadline (Session C)

AUGUST 16: Nonimpacted Course Refund Deadline (Session C)

AUGUST 30: Grading Basis Change Deadline (Session C)